Nicholas Holm

Senior Lecturer
English and Media Studies
Massey University
E-mail: n.h.f.holm@massey.ac.nz
Page: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/expertise/profile.cfm?stref=990001

Fields of interest:

Cultural and Media Theory, Political Aesthetics, Frankfurt School, Marxism and Post-Marxism, Eco-Criticism, Humour, Popular Culture.

Recent publications:

Holm, Nicholas. Humour as Politics: The Political Aesthetics of Contemporary Media Comedy. London: Palgrave, 2017.

Holm, Nicholas and Sy Taffel, eds. Ecological Entanglements in the Anthropocene. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2017.

Holm, Nicholas. “The Politics of Deadpan in Australasian Satire.” Satire and Politics. Ed. Jessica Milner Davis. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017. 103–124.

Holm, Nicholas. “Consider the Lawnmower: Aesthetics, Politics and Entanglements of Suburban Nature.” Ecological Entanglements in the Anthropocene. Ed. Nicholas Holm and Sy Taffel. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2017. 17-34.

Holm, Nicholas. “Art for Fun and Profit: The Political Aesthetics of Advertising.” Explorations in Critical Studies in Advertising. Ed. James F. Hamilton, Robert Bodle and Ezequiel Korin. London: Routledge, 2017. 97-109.

Holm, Nicholas. Advertising and Consumer Society: A Critical Introduction. London: Palgrave, 2016.

Holm, Nicholas. “Humour as Edge-Work: Aesthetics, Joke-Work and Tendentiousness in Tosh.0.” Comedy Studies 7.1 (2016): 108 – 121.

Holm, Nicholas. “Consider the Possum: Foes, Anti-Animals, and Colonists in Paradise.” Animals Studies Journal 4.1 (2015): 32 – 56.

Holm, Nicholas. “Consider the Squirrel: Freaks, Vermin and Value in the Ruin(s) of Nature.” Cultural Critique 80 (2012): 56 – 95.

Holm, Nicholas. “Ex(or)cising the spirit of Japan: Ringu, The Ring and the persistence of Japan.” Journal of Popular Film and Television 39.4 (2011): 183 – 192.

Holm, Nicholas. “The Distribution of the Nonsensical and the Political Aesthetics of Humour.” “Transformations 19 (2011): n. pag.

“Conspiracy Theorizing Surveillance: Considering Modalities of Paranoia and Conspiracy in Surveillance Studies.” Surveillance and Society. 7.1 (2009): 36 – 48.